(Source: heilflorez)

@1 month ago with 33 notes
frogrammer:

your—echo:

typing made simple (via Andy Rementer)

frogrammer:

your—echo:

typing made simple (via Andy Rementer)

@1 month ago with 93 notes

japaneseaesthetics:

Album of Hawks and Calligraphy, by artist

Kano Tsunenobu (Japanese, 1636–1713), 17th–18th century, Japan. from album; ink and color on silk. H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929.  MET.

This album containing pictures of hawks—posed on boughs or rocks, awaiting their prey, and one with its prey already ensnared—was probably created for a young male member of the samurai elite, to instill appreciation for hawking and Chinese learning. The calligraphy, by an unidentified artist, is inscribed on sumptuously colored silk decorated with golden phoenixes, and the content is taken from a Confucian didactic text. Tsunenobu was a painter in the service of the Tokugawa shogunate. In 1650, while still a teenager, he took over from his father as the head of the Kobikichō Kano school in Edo. Hawking had become the exclusive right of samurai earlier in the seventeenth century, during the reign of Ieyasu, the first Tokugawa shogun, who was an avid practitioner. But between 1693 and 1709, toward the end of the artist’s life, hawking had been temporarily suspended by his primary patron, Tokugawa Tsunayoshi (1646–1709). Though Tsunayoshi was tyrannical in his politics, he was famous for his compassion toward birds and animals, to the extent that he made maltreatment of dogs a capital offense, earning him the nickname the Dog Shogun. Tokugawa Yoshimune (1684–1751), the eighth shogun, revived falconry for the warrior class, and authored a treatise on crane hawking”.  Text and images via MET.

(Source: metmuseum.org, via centuriespast)

@1 month ago with 1391 notes

(Source: adove)

@1 month ago with 64 notes
#whoa 
Hbd @sarahdziedzic 🌹🍬🍭

Hbd @sarahdziedzic 🌹🍬🍭

@1 month ago with 11 notes
mrkiki:

Wim DelvoyeMosaic, 1990Collage, gouache and ink on paper.  83 x 69.5 cm (32 5/8 x 27 3/8 in)

mrkiki:

Wim Delvoye
Mosaic, 1990
Collage, gouache and ink on paper.  
83 x 69.5 cm (32 5/8 x 27 3/8 in)

(via laukitsch)

@1 month ago with 75 notes

fanciullagentile:

Abbey Lincoln/Max Roach 5tet//Driva Man

@1 month ago with 20 notes
queennubian:

fanufactured:

rootworkn:

museumartblog:

museumartblog:

My dreads a few months ago. They changed fast.

Calm down guys. It’s just a picture of new dreads and loose hair. It takes a while to lock up. It’s a process.

Your blatent cultural appropriation and disrespect now has your hair looking like a fucking rats nest with pencils and dust bunnies in it.
You got an ask telling you what the problem is, and you ignored it- classic caught white girl. “Its just a hairstyle I like!”
That shit is not doing it.

Reblogging this to explain why there are people of color upset about this hideous, hideous display:
I am a man of color who wears locs. My hair has been loc’d since 2005. It is clean, I maintain it monthly, moisturize it weekly and wash it as needed (this can be multiple times a month if I’m feeling athletic and trying to get my fitness on). It is loc’d to the root. I went through the early loc’ing phase when I was in college but AT NO POINT did it look dirty, unclean or unwashed.
DAILY I have people who try to connect the dots between my hair and my race and use that against me. I have people (COWORKERS) who’ve thought I was a drug dealer (I barely drink) and have people who classify me as a thug because of the way I wear the hair God gave me.
People (white) who come up to me and tell me how they”dreaded their hair for a few months but cut it out because it was so dirty, you know what I mean?” I wear my hair pulled back in a neat ponytail 97% of the time because I know all this hair makes white people nervous. Imagine if everytime someone saw you they assumed you were dirty, simply because they tried to do something you did (locs) and failed because their hair texture wasn’t correct, and instead of realizing that maybe it was just their situation, they’ve decided to apply that to everyone they meet.
And this nasty, unwashed young woman who feels the need to rebel against something (probably a shower) is sitting up proclaiming to the world that she has locs?
White privilege at work. Not only would I be unemployed if I had the audacity to traipse into my job looking like the inside of a drain, but I would immediately be classified as more of a thug than people already THINK I AM.
That’s why we’re upset. Black women can’t even wear their hair the way it grows out of their heads without it being a national scandal, yet this unwashed, unclean, clearly disturbed individual whose friends obviously have not informed her of the error of her ways will walk out in public and people will not only accept her, they will applaud her for being so different and unique.
Women like this are DIRECTLY affecting my life in that almost everyone I encounter has a friend or a cousin who is her and has given an entire LEGION of people a bad rap.
This is why cultural appropriation is harmful: when we do something and excel at it, are professional about it, look good doing it, it’s worthless. But throw it on a white body doing it the most lazy, bastardized, mediocre way ever and suddenly not only is it OK, it’s amazing! And so much better! 
*PS It really does look horrible. 

because it’s time for school again

queennubian:

fanufactured:

rootworkn:

museumartblog:

museumartblog:

My dreads a few months ago. They changed fast.

Calm down guys. It’s just a picture of new dreads and loose hair. It takes a while to lock up. It’s a process.

Your blatent cultural appropriation and disrespect now has your hair looking like a fucking rats nest with pencils and dust bunnies in it.

You got an ask telling you what the problem is, and you ignored it- classic caught white girl. “Its just a hairstyle I like!”

That shit is not doing it.

Reblogging this to explain why there are people of color upset about this hideous, hideous display:

I am a man of color who wears locs. My hair has been loc’d since 2005. It is clean, I maintain it monthly, moisturize it weekly and wash it as needed (this can be multiple times a month if I’m feeling athletic and trying to get my fitness on). It is loc’d to the root. I went through the early loc’ing phase when I was in college but AT NO POINT did it look dirty, unclean or unwashed.

DAILY I have people who try to connect the dots between my hair and my race and use that against me. I have people (COWORKERS) who’ve thought I was a drug dealer (I barely drink) and have people who classify me as a thug because of the way I wear the hair God gave me.

People (white) who come up to me and tell me how they”dreaded their hair for a few months but cut it out because it was so dirty, you know what I mean?” I wear my hair pulled back in a neat ponytail 97% of the time because I know all this hair makes white people nervous. Imagine if everytime someone saw you they assumed you were dirty, simply because they tried to do something you did (locs) and failed because their hair texture wasn’t correct, and instead of realizing that maybe it was just their situation, they’ve decided to apply that to everyone they meet.

And this nasty, unwashed young woman who feels the need to rebel against something (probably a shower) is sitting up proclaiming to the world that she has locs?

White privilege at work. Not only would I be unemployed if I had the audacity to traipse into my job looking like the inside of a drain, but I would immediately be classified as more of a thug than people already THINK I AM.

That’s why we’re upset. Black women can’t even wear their hair the way it grows out of their heads without it being a national scandal, yet this unwashed, unclean, clearly disturbed individual whose friends obviously have not informed her of the error of her ways will walk out in public and people will not only accept her, they will applaud her for being so different and unique.

Women like this are DIRECTLY affecting my life in that almost everyone I encounter has a friend or a cousin who is her and has given an entire LEGION of people a bad rap.

This is why cultural appropriation is harmful: when we do something and excel at it, are professional about it, look good doing it, it’s worthless. But throw it on a white body doing it the most lazy, bastardized, mediocre way ever and suddenly not only is it OK, it’s amazing! And so much better! 

*PS It really does look horrible. 

because it’s time for school again

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

@1 month ago with 44694 notes
#white dreds #cultural appropriation #don't think she's disturbed but definitely ignorant 
sad guy stance

sad guy stance

@1 month ago with 5 notes

nowavemusic:

Theoretical Girls - You Got Me

(You Got Me / US Millie, 1978)

(via jockgestapo)

@1 month ago with 126 note and 509 play
ayenako:

Victoria Ruiz from Downtown Boys

Victoria is a fucking powerful & beautiful force, not to ever be fucked with

ayenako:

Victoria Ruiz from Downtown Boys

Victoria is a fucking powerful & beautiful force, not to ever be fucked with

@1 month ago with 1491 notes
#downtown boys #Victoria 
thethirdmind:

International Times, February 1977.(click image for hi-res)
[via International Times Archive]

thethirdmind:

International Times, February 1977.
(click image for hi-res)

[via International Times Archive]

(Source: ozkar-krapo, via motel-chronicler)

@1 month ago with 411 notes
@1 month ago with 177259 notes

(via garbagecult)

@1 month ago with 62797 notes
burn it up

burn it up

@1 month ago with 4 notes